Categories
Tanzania

Selous Reserve

The Selous Game Reserve is one of the largest fauna reserves of the world, located in the south of Tanzania. It was named after Englishman Sir Frederick Selous, a famous big game hunter and early conservationist, who died at Beho Beho in this territory in 1917 while fighting against the Germans during World War I. Scottish explorer and cartographer Keith Johnston also died at Beho Beho in 1879 while leading a RSGS expedition to the Great Lakes of Africa with Joseph Thomson. The Selous was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982 due to the diversity of its wildlife and undisturbed nature.

The reserve covers a total area of 54,600 km² (21,081 square miles), has additional buffer zones and no permanent human habitation or permanent structures are permitted. All (human) entry and exit is carefully controlled by the Tanzanian Game Dept. Some of the typical animals of the savanna (for example elephants, hippopotami, African Wild Dog cape buffalo and crocodiles) can be found in this park in larger numbers than in any other African game reserve or national park. The Selous is one of the last remaining pristine true wilderness areas in the world.

The area was first designated a protected area in 1896 by the German Governor Hermann von Wissmann and became a hunting reserve in 1905. Nowadays it also has a touristic importance, though most of it is rarely visited by humans. Presence of the Tsetse fly and very difficult road access discourage visitation; however, it is easily accessible by train or small aircraft from Dar es Salaam.

Source: Wikipedia (under GNU Free Documentation License)

Categories
Gabon

Evengué

Evengue is a small Island (2 km²) in the Fernan Vaz Lagoon, 10 km south-east of the town of Omboue.

Here, there is a gorilla sanctuary and a centre of their reintroduction. A part of this population can be seen in natural conditions. Watching them is truly exciting. They are majestic, human-like and gorgeous. Their ways of behaving are very similar to ours and their look deeply touches a heart.

Categories
Madagascar

Andasibe

Andasibe-Mantadia National Park is a 155 square kilometre protected area consisting principally of primary growth forest in Toamasina Province in eastern Madagascar. The park’s elevation ranges from 900-1250 meters, with a humid climate. Average annual precipitation is 1700 mm, with rainfall on 210 days of each year. This rainforest is habitat to a vast species biodiversity, including many endemic rare species and endangered species, including 11 lemur species. The park’s two component parts are Mantadia National Park and Analamazaotra Reserve, which is best known for its population of Madagascar’s largest lemur, the Indri.

The main threat to this park comes from the disappearance of adjoining habitat outside the park. This disappearance has been caused primarily by logging and replacement of rainforest with commercial Australian eucalyptus and Chinese pine forests, and to a lesser extent by slash-and-burn cultivation for rice agriculture, which is exacerbated by the extremely high population growth rate and poverty in rural Madagascar.

To address the disappearing habitat threat, reserves have been created in the vicinity of Andasibe-Mantadia that balance resource extraction with environmental protection, and attempt to create economic and environmentally-preferable alternatives to replacing native forests with eucalyptus and pine.

Source: Wikipedia (under GNU Free Documentation License)

Categories
Madagascar

Anjajavy


Categories
Madagascar

Berenty

Berenty Reserve is a small private reserve of gallery forest along the Mandrake river, set in the semi-arid spiny forest ecoregion of the far south of Madagascar. For some years Primatologist Alison Jolly and student volunteers have visited Berenty to conduct fieldwork on Lemurs. The reserve is also a favourite for visitors who want to see some of Madagascar’s endemic bird species, which include Owls and Couas.

The reserve has accommodation in the forest and a set of forest trails to explore. It attracts the most visitors of any Madagascar nature reserve. It is reached after a two hour drive from Tôlagnaro on the southeast coast.

Source: Wikipedia (under GNU Free Documentation License)